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Cognitive Abilities Test

What is the Cognitive Abilities Test used to determine?

CogAT appraises the cognitive development of students from kindergarten through grade 12. The test measures students’ learned reasoning abilities. These abilities are developed through in-school and out-of-school experiences.

The questions of CogAT require students to demonstrate their reasoning abilities in each of the three symbol systems most closely related to success in school: verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and nonverbal reasoning.

  • The Verbal Battery assesses students’ abilities to use search, retrieval, and comparison processes that are essential for verbal reasoning. Subtests include Verbal Classification, Sentence Completion and Verbal Analogies. The focus is on vocabulary, comprehension and word relationships.
    Example: Choose the word that best completes this sentence: Apples_____ on trees.
    Answer Choices: fall; grow; show; bloom; spread.
  • The Quantitative Battery assesses students’ abilities to reason about patterns and relations using concepts that are essential in quantitative thinking. Subtests include Qualitative Relations, Number Series and Relation Building. The focus is on abstract reasoning and problem solving.
    Example: What number comes next in this series: 7, 14, 21, 28
    Answer Choices: 56, 49, 35, 42
  • The Nonverbal Battery assesses students’ abilities to reason with somewhat more novel questions that use spatial and figural content. These subtests require no reading. They include Figure Classification, Figure Analogies and Figure Analysis.
    Example: Student solves analogies using figures instead of numbers or words.

What is the format of the CogAT?

The CogAT for students in Grades 1-2 is an untimed, multiple choice test. The students make their answer selections in the test booklet. Beginning at the third grade level, the CogAT is a timed, multiple choice test with an electronically scored answer sheet on which students mark their choices.

How is the test scored?

Scores are reported using National Percentile Rank. A percentile rank indicates the percentage of students in the same age group whose scores fall below the score obtained by a particular student. For example, if a fifth-grade student obtains a PR of 90 on the Quantitative Battery, it means that 90 percent of the 5th grade students in the standardized sample received lower scores than this particular student. Please note the percentile rank is not the same as the percent of test items correct.

How can I prepare my child for the test?

Students perform best on tests when they are rested and relaxed. Children test best that have had a stress-free evening the night before, have had a good breakfast, and plenty of rest, and are encouraged to show their best without worry or pressure. Children who enjoy learning puzzles and games (word games, crossword puzzles, chess, logic puzzles, etc) may find some of the test items similar.

(Adapted from Riverside Publishing resources)

Iowa Assessments

What tests will my child take?

Students will take subtests in the areas of Reading and Mathematics. All subtests take 30 minutes or less to complete.

What is the format of the Iowa Assessments?

The Iowa Assessments are multiple choice tests. At the first and second grade level, students make their answer selections in the test booklet. Beginning at the third grade level, students use an electronically scored answer sheet to mark their choices.

How are the tests scored?

Scores are reported using National Percentile Rank. A percentile rank indicates the percentage of students in the same grade group whose scores fall below the score obtained by a particular student. For example, if a third grade student obtains a PR of 67 on the Reading Subtest, it means that 67 percent of the third grade students in the standardized sample received lower scores than this particular student. Please note the percentile rank is not the same as the percent of test items correct.

Other frequently asked questions can be found at the following link:

http://www.riversidepublishing.com/products/ia/learnmore.html

Cognitive Abilities Test

What is the Cognitive Abilities Test used to determine?

CogAT appraises the cognitive development of students from kindergarten through grade 12. The test measures students’ learned reasoning abilities. These abilities are developed through in-school and out-of-school experiences.

The questions of CogAT require students to demonstrate their reasoning abilities in each of the three symbol systems most closely related to success in school: verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and nonverbal reasoning.

  • The Verbal Battery assesses students’ abilities to use search, retrieval, and comparison processes that are essential for verbal reasoning. Subtests include Verbal Classification, Sentence Completion and Verbal Analogies. The focus is on vocabulary, comprehension and word relationships.
    Example: Choose the word that best completes this sentence: Apples_____ on trees.
    Answer Choices: fall; grow; show; bloom; spread.
  • The Quantitative Battery assesses students’ abilities to reason about patterns and relations using concepts that are essential in quantitative thinking. Subtests include Qualitative Relations, Number Series and Relation Building. The focus is on abstract reasoning and problem solving.
    Example: What number comes next in this series: 7, 14, 21, 28
    Answer Choices: 56, 49, 35, 42
  • The Nonverbal Battery assesses students’ abilities to reason with somewhat more novel questions that use spatial and figural content. These subtests require no reading. They include Figure Classification, Figure Analogies and Figure Analysis.
    Example: Student solves analogies using figures instead of numbers or words.

What is the format of the CogAT?

The CogAT for students in Grades 1-2 is an untimed, multiple choice test. The students make their answer selections in the test booklet. Beginning at the third grade level, the CogAT is a timed, multiple choice test with an electronically scored answer sheet on which students mark their choices.

How is the test scored?

Scores are reported using National Percentile Rank. A percentile rank indicates the percentage of students in the same age group whose scores fall below the score obtained by a particular student. For example, if a fifth-grade student obtains a PR of 90 on the Quantitative Battery, it means that 90 percent of the 5th grade students in the standardized sample received lower scores than this particular student. Please note the percentile rank is not the same as the percent of test items correct.

How can I prepare my child for the test?

Students perform best on tests when they are rested and relaxed. Children test best that have had a stress-free evening the night before, have had a good breakfast, and plenty of rest, and are encouraged to show their best without worry or pressure. Children who enjoy learning puzzles and games (word games, crossword puzzles, chess, logic puzzles, etc) may find some of the test items similar.

(Adapted from Riverside Publishing resources)

Iowa Assessments

What tests will my child take?

Students will take subtests in the areas of Reading and Mathematics. All subtests take 30 minutes or less to complete.

What is the format of the Iowa Assessments?

The Iowa Assessments are multiple choice tests. At the first and second grade level, students make their answer selections in the test booklet. Beginning at the third grade level, students use an electronically scored answer sheet to mark their choices.

How are the tests scored?

Scores are reported using National Percentile Rank. A percentile rank indicates the percentage of students in the same grade group whose scores fall below the score obtained by a particular student. For example, if a third grade student obtains a PR of 67 on the Reading Subtest, it means that 67 percent of the third grade students in the standardized sample received lower scores than this particular student. Please note the percentile rank is not the same as the percent of test items correct.

Other frequently asked questions can be found at the following link:

http://www.riversidepublishing.com/products/ia/learnmore.html

Iowa Algebra Aptitude Test

What does the test include?

The IAAT is a timed test consisting of 60 items divided evenly into four subtests. The time limit for each subtest is 10 minutes. The four subtests are:

Pre-Algebraic Number Skills and Concepts

The items on this subtest measure a student’s computational skills, understanding of mathematical concepts and the ability to solve mathematics problems.

Interpreting Mathematical Information

The items on this subtest are based upon information presented in graphs or upon definitions of mathematical terms or operations. The items assess how well a student can learn new material presented in graphs or text.

Representing Relationships

For each of the exercises in this part of the test, the student must find the rule that represents the given numerical relationship. Some of the items present the relationship in table form while others present the relationship in verbal form.

Using Symbols

The last subtest measures how well students understand some of the important symbols of algebra and how they are used.

(Riverside Publishing)

Iowa Algebra Aptitude Test

What does the test include?

The IAAT is a timed test consisting of 60 items divided evenly into four subtests. The time limit for each subtest is 10 minutes. The four subtests are:

Pre-Algebraic Number Skills and Concepts

The items on this subtest measure a student’s computational skills, understanding of mathematical concepts and the ability to solve mathematics problems.

Interpreting Mathematical Information

The items on this subtest are based upon information presented in graphs or upon definitions of mathematical terms or operations. The items assess how well a student can learn new material presented in graphs or text.

Representing Relationships

For each of the exercises in this part of the test, the student must find the rule that represents the given numerical relationship. Some of the items present the relationship in table form while others present the relationship in verbal form.

Using Symbols

The last subtest measures how well students understand some of the important symbols of algebra and how they are used.

(Riverside Publishing)

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